March 13, 2017

SNAP: Our Nation’s Frontline Defense Against Hunger

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For many of us, our Jewish values and ideals have shaped us as committed advocates for social justice. As advocates, we are reminded daily that our work is not easy. We are also reminded daily that our work is imperative. 

At MAZON we know that we can never foodbank our way out hunger. The scope of food insecurity is too large; the charitable response, too small. Food pantries and soup kitchens were not conceived to feed entire communities. They provide a vital short-term response, but they will never solve the systemic problem of hunger. 

It is programs like SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, aka food stamps) that are our nation’s frontline defense against hunger. SNAP also happens to be at the foundation of MAZON’s advocacy work. 

Who relies on SNAP? 45.7 million Americans used SNAP to put food on the table in 2015. Children, seniors
and people with disabilities make up two-thirds of SNAP benefit recipients. About 90% of households live below the poverty line. Families like Jennifer’s, whose story we heard as part of our This Is Hunger initiative: “Thank goodness I get foodstamps. Otherwise, we wouldn’t eat. But we still run out of food by the last week of the month.”

With SNAP under threat, the families that struggle to put food on the table need our voices now more than ever.  

So how can you help us advocate for SNAP and the millions of Americans who cannot feed their families without it? 

Learn about SNAP so that you have a deeper understanding and knowledge of this indispensable program. (We published a new educational series at mazon.org/SNAPseries). Sign our petition at mazon.org/SNAP so that we can send a strong message to House Speaker Paul Ryan that SNAP is crucial. Prepare to mobilize when we need you - because we will need you.

We rely on you – your support, your voice – just as the families struggling rely on us. Together, we can transform how it is into how it should be. 

Letter from Leadership, from Spring 2017 Newsletter